Archive for the SEO Category

8 major Google algorithm updates, explained

Posted in advertising, Google, interactive advertising, online marketing, PPC, search engines, SEM, SEO with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2020 by gadler

In this post, we will be counting down eight of the most critical search algorithm changes. We will look into why these updates were introduced, how they work and what adjustments we had to make to our SEO strategies in response.
— Read on searchengineland.com/8-major-google-algorithm-updates-explained-282627

10 Bad Links That Can Get You Penalized by Google

Posted in advertising, Google, interactive advertising, search engines, SEM, SEO with tags , , , , , , , , , , on November 26, 2019 by gadler

Every SEO professional worth their salt knows that links (along with content) are the backbone of SEO.

Links continue to remain a significant ranking factor.

What happens when you get bad links on enough of a scale to harm your site?

Your site can get algorithmically downgraded by Google – or worse, you get a manual action.

While Google maintains they are good at ignoring bad links, enough bad links can harm your site’s ranking.

This guide will explain 10 different types of bad links that can get you penalized, and what you can do about them.

— Read on www.searchenginejournal.com/link-building-guide/bad-links-risky-tactics/

Here’s what you need to know about Google’s newest local algorithm update

Posted in Google, interactive advertising, search engines, SEO with tags , , , , , , , on November 16, 2019 by gadler

Google’s biggest local algorithm update since 2016 will require businesses and agencies to be more vigilant about fighting spam in affected areas.
— Read on searchengineland.com/heres-what-you-need-to-know-about-googles-newest-algorithm-update-possum-2-0-324927

The North Face booed by SEO community

Posted in digital media, Google, search engines, SEO with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 8, 2019 by gadler

“Last week, outdoor clothing brand The North Face and its ad agency Leo Burnett Tailor Made, came under fire after the agency updated images on Wikipedia pages for popular travel destinations. The efforts were part of a campaign to get The North Face branding at the top of Google image search results when anyone searched for the corresponding travel locations.

The brand initially claimed it collaborated with Wikimedia for the SEO campaign, but later apologized for the campaign after the Wikimedia Foundation published a response saying The North Face had unethically manipulated Wikipedia and risked the trust in Wikipedia’s mission, “for a short-lived marketing stunt.”

Read the full Search Engine Land article here: searchengineland.com/the-north-face-gets-a-thumbs-down-from-seo-community-after-manipulating-google-image-search-results-317747

What’s wrong with translating keywords?

Posted in AdWords, Google, PPC, search engines, SEM, SEO, voice first with tags , , , , , , on May 21, 2019 by gadler

“…As Google, Yandex and Baidu have developed their search engines and added more automation, machine learning, AI and sophisticated systems, today’s guidance should be:

“Whatever you do, whatever robot you use, do not in any circumstances use any kind of system to translate your keywords – or you will be sent straight to jail without passing go.”
— Read on searchengineland.com/whats-wrong-with-translating-keywords-317281

How do you optimize content for a voice-first world?

Posted in search engines, SEM, SEO, voice first with tags , , , on February 13, 2018 by gadler

Want to know how to optimize your content for voice search? Contributor Sherry Bonelli shares how to incorporate smart SEO tactics to increase the chance of being heard.
— Read on searchengineland.com/optimize-content-voice-first-world-291782

SEO Cheat Sheet: 15 Common Oversights Found During Site Audits – Search Engine Watch (#SEW)

Posted in advertising, interactive advertising, online marketing, search engines, SEO on July 18, 2013 by gadler

SEO Cheat Sheet: 15 Common Oversights Found During Site Audits – Search Engine Watch (#SEW).

B2B Marketers Focus on SEO and PPC

Posted in interactive advertising, internet, PPC, SEO on February 22, 2012 by gadler

Infographic: The Periodic Table Of SEO Ranking Factors

Posted in search engines, SEO on June 4, 2011 by gadler

When used correctly, search engine optimization can get your content ranked higher on search results pages. Used poorly, you might end up masking your content with catchy phrases. Search Engine Land illustrated a handy dandy guide, the ABCs of SEO, if you will. Below, you’ll find the major factors to focus on for search engine ranking success.

Original Link: http://feeds.paidcontent.org/~r/pcorg/~3/yb0Fun3r5iI/

The New Google Analytics: Events Goals

Posted in advertising, digital media, Google, interactive advertising, online marketing, PPC, search engines, SEM, SEO with tags , on April 6, 2011 by gadler

This is part of our series of posts highlighting the new Google Analytics. The new version of Google Analytics is currently available in beta to a number of Analytics users. We’ll be giving access to even more users soon. Sign up for early access. And follow Google Analytics on Twitter for the latest updates.
Real Analytics ninjas use goals. Google Analytics has always had URL Goals (when a visitor reaches a specific page). In 2009, we added Engagement Goals to track success metrics around visit depth and time on site. With the new version of Google Analytics, we’ve added one more: Event Goals. This was one of our most requested features, and it gives you even more reason to use event tracking.
A brief intro to Event TrackingYou can use Event Tracking in Google Analytics to track visitor actions that don’t correspond directly to pageviews. It’s a great fit for tracking things like:
* Downloads of a PDF or other file
* Interaction with dynamic or AJAX sites
* Interaction with Adobe Flash objects, embedded videos, and other media
* Number of errors users get when attempting to checkout
* How long a video was watched on your site

Events are defined using a set of Categories, Actions, Labels, and Values. Here’s how you might set up event tracking for tracking downloads of whitepapers and presentations.

These interactions all have potential business impact, but until now you couldn’t track them as goals in Google Analytics. Let’s look at three ways you might use Event Goals on your site.
Tracking DownloadsSuppose you run a business to business (B2B) website and offer whitepapers (as a PDF download) in order to attract leads. You drive traffic to this page through advertising. You can track the number of downloads using event tracking. For example, we can use the category to designate the click was of type “download”. We can use the action to designate the download was a “whitepaper” and we can use the label to identify the actual whitepaper that was downloaded.
With the new Google Analytics, configuring this as a goal is easy. We simply match any event with the category of “download” and the action of “whitepaper”. Finally we set the goal value as 20.

Tracking Time SpentEvent tracking is powerful because you can track values, along with the category, action, and label. Going back to our B2B website, suppose you have a embedded product demo video on your page. With a little JavaScript, you can track the time a user spends watching the video and send that number back to Google Analytics as an event value.
With Event Goals, you can now set up a goal based on this value. In this example, we’ve configured a goal when a user spends over 180 seconds watching the product demo.

Using The Event Value As The Conversion ValueTraditionally, the only way to set goal values was when creating the goal in Google Analytics, or from the tracking code using ecommerce tracking. With Event Goals, you have another option: using the event value as the goal value.
Again putting yourself in the shoes of a B2B website owner, you realize not all your whitepapers bring in the same quality of lead. The lead value associated with downloading a certain whitepaper is $20, but the lead value from a different whitepaper is $35. Rather than creating a separate goal for each, you can pass the values 20 and 35 as the Event Value, and then set up the goal to use the actual Event Value:

Now when a goal is matched, the value passed in the event will be used as the goal value.
These are just a few examples of how you can take advantage of Event Goals in the new Google Analytics. You can read more on how to implement Event Tracking on Google Code and how to set up goals in the new Analytics. We’re constantly giving more of you access to the new version. If you don’t have the new version yet, you can sign up for earlier access.
Posted by Nick Mihailovski, Google Analytics TeamThis is part of our series of posts highlighting the new Google Analytics. The new version of Google Analytics is currently available in beta to a number of Analytics users. We’ll be giving access to even more users soon. Sign up for early access. And follow Google Analytics on Twitter for the latest updates.
Real Analytics ninjas use goals. Google Analytics has always had URL Goals (when a visitor reaches a specific page). In 2009, we added Engagement Goals to track success metrics around visit depth and time on site. With the new version of Google Analytics, we’ve added one more: Event Goals. This was one of our most requested features, and it gives you even more reason to use event tracking.
A brief intro to Event TrackingYou can use Event Tracking in Google Analytics to track visitor actions that don’t correspond directly to pageviews. It’s a great fit for tracking things like:
* Downloads of a PDF or other file
* Interaction with dynamic or AJAX sites
* Interaction with Adobe Flash objects, embedded videos, and other media
* Number of errors users get when attempting to checkout
* How long a video was watched on your site

Events are defined using a set of Categories, Actions, Labels, and Values. Here’s how you might set up event tracking for tracking downloads of whitepapers and presentations.

These interactions all have potential business impact, but until now you couldn’t track them as goals in Google Analytics. Let’s look at three ways you might use Event Goals on your site.
Tracking DownloadsSuppose you run a business to business (B2B) website and offer whitepapers (as a PDF download) in order to attract leads. You drive traffic to this page through advertising. You can track the number of downloads using event tracking. For example, we can use the category to designate the click was of type “download”. We can use the action to designate the download was a “whitepaper” and we can use the label to identify the actual whitepaper that was downloaded.
With the new Google Analytics, configuring this as a goal is easy. We simply match any event with the category of “download” and the action of “whitepaper”. Finally we set the goal value as 20.

Tracking Time SpentEvent tracking is powerful because you can track values, along with the category, action, and label. Going back to our B2B website, suppose you have a embedded product demo video on your page. With a little JavaScript, you can track the time a user spends watching the video and send that number back to Google Analytics as an event value.
With Event Goals, you can now set up a goal based on this value. In this example, we’ve configured a goal when a user spends over 180 seconds watching the product demo.

Using The Event Value As The Conversion ValueTraditionally, the only way to set goal values was when creating the goal in Google Analytics, or from the tracking code using ecommerce tracking. With Event Goals, you have another option: using the event value as the goal value.
Again putting yourself in the shoes of a B2B website owner, you realize not all your whitepapers bring in the same quality of lead. The lead value associated with downloading a certain whitepaper is $20, but the lead value from a different whitepaper is $35. Rather than creating a separate goal for each, you can pass the values 20 and 35 as the Event Value, and then set up the goal to use the actual Event Value:

Now when a goal is matched, the value passed in the event will be used as the goal value.
These are just a few examples of how you can take advantage of Event Goals in the new Google Analytics. You can read more on how to implement Event Tracking on Google Code and how to set up goals in the new Analytics. We’re constantly giving more of you access to the new version. If you don’t have the new version yet, you can sign up for earlier access

Original Link: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/tRaA/~3/BU8O3XvOPI0/new-google-analytics-events-goals.html

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